Rirkrit Tiravanija

Thai conceptual and installation artist residing in New York, Berlin, and Chiang Mai. He was born in Argentina in 1961. Tiravanija’s practice often involves everyday actions and commonplace materials, as well as audience interaction. His first untitled solo show, at 303 Gallery, New York in 1992, consisted of offering visitors Thai food cooked on-site. His installations often take the form of stages or rooms for sharing meals, cooking, reading or playing music; architecture or structures for living and socializing are a core element in his work.

Thai conceptual and installation artist residing in New York, Berlin, and Chiang Mai. He was born in Argentina in 1961. Tiravanija’s practice often involves everyday actions and commonplace materials, as well as audience interaction. His first untitled solo show, at 303 Gallery, New York in 1992, consisted of offering visitors Thai food cooked on-site. His installations often take the form of stages or rooms for sharing meals, cooking, reading or playing music. Architecture or structures for living and socializing are a core element in his work. Rirkrit Tiravanija is interested in the visitor and how he relates and interacts with the work. The participatory and performative aspects of Tiravanija’s art, combined with straightforward instructions, recall elements found in work by the Japanese Fluxus artist Yoko Ono. Tiravanija’s strategy of audience participation also echoes the approach of the German conceptual artist Joseph Beuys in the 1970s, who declared that ‘everyone is an artist’ and also defined ‘social sculpture’ as a form in which dialogue and ideas are an artist’s primary media. For more about Tiravanija see MOMA.

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