Richard Long

Walking in the mountains, fields, or along the seaside all over the world, Richard Long has been turning his walks into art for over almost 40 years. His vision of sculpture has contributed to great changes in conventional formative sculpture. After studying at art schools in his hometown Bristol and London in the 1960s, he started to produce artworks focusing on the relationship between man and nature. With his unique method of working, creating simple shapes like circles or lines in natural materials like wood or stone on his walks, and then documenting the work in photographs, maps or text works, Long has been a hugely influential figure. In 1989 he was awarded the Turner Prize, the most prestigious prize in British contemporary art scene and this year, at 64, Long was the subject of a large-scale solo exhibition at Tate Britain, London. Walking in the mountains, fields, or along the seaside all over the world, Richard Long has been turning his walks into art for over almost 40 years. His vision of sculpture has contributed to great changes in conventional formative sculpture. After studying at art schools in his hometown Bristol and London in the 1960s, he started to produce artworks focusing on the relationship between man and nature. With his unique method of working, creating simple shapes like circles or lines in natural materials like wood or stone on his walks, and then documenting the work in photographs, maps or text works, Long has been a hugely influential figure. In 1989 he was awarded the Turner Prize, the most prestigious prize in British contemporary art scene and this year, at 64, Long was the subject of a large-scale solo exhibition at Tate Britain, London. Walking in the mountains, fields, or along the seaside all over the world, Richard Long has been turning his walks into art for over almost 40 years. His vision of sculpture has contributed to great changes in conventional formative sculpture. After studying at art schools in his hometown Bristol and London in the 1960s, he started to produce artworks focusing on the relationship between man and nature. With his unique method of working, creating simple shapes like circles or lines in natural materials like wood or stone on his walks, and then documenting the work in photographs, maps or text works, Long has been a hugely influential figure. In 1989 he was awarded the Turner Prize, the most prestigious prize in British contemporary art scene and this year, at 64, Long was the subject of a large-scale solo exhibition at Tate Britain, London.

Walking in the mountains, fields, or along the seaside all over the world, Richard Long has been turning his walks into art for over almost 40 years. His vision of sculpture has contributed to great changes in conventional formative sculpture. After studying at art schools in his hometown Bristol and London in the 1960s, he started to produce artworks focusing on the relationship between man and nature. With his unique method of working, creating simple shapes like circles or lines in natural materials like wood or stone on his walks, and then documenting the work in photographs, maps or text works, Long has been a hugely influential figure. Long is the only artist to be shortlisted for the Turner Prize four times, and he is reputed to have refused the prize in 1984. He was nominated in 1984, 1987, 1988 and he then won the award in 1989 for White Water Line. Unlike many other contemporary / conceptual artists, Long makes all his art himself and talks about the energy between the finished work and his hands. In other words, the ‘touch of the artist’ is important in his work. Richard Long’s official website is here

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