Eastern Thoughts: a travel memoir by Marta Maia and Vitor Queiroz

“And everything starts at the airport. […] Structures that put us closer to the rest of the world and that separate us from the people who have seen us grow.”

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Eastern Thoughts is a poetic, philosophical, and tender reflection on the phenomenon of travelling. Writer Marta Maia and photographer Vitor Queiroz traverse 1708 km through Cambodia, Vietnam and Thailand to bring us an inward contemplation on the feelings attached to journeying, the complexity (and complicity) of tourism, the meaning of home and belonging, our attachment to memory, and more. This book will be of interest to and a consolation for all those travelers at heart who constantly seek out for an embracing place, and are always a little bit homesick.
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Book: Conceptual Revolutions in 20th Century Art

Hannah Höch, Cut with the Dada Kitchen Knife through the Last Weimar Beer-Belly Cultural Epoch in Germany, 1919, collage of pasted papers, 90x144 cm

Hannah Höch, Cut with the Dada Kitchen Knife through the Last Weimar Beer-Belly Cultural Epoch in Germany, 1919, collage of pasted papers, 90×144 cm

Conceptual Revolutions in Twentieth-Century Art by David W. Galenson offers an useful overview of the modern and post-modern art looking at how the new art-market structure (initiated by the late 19th century Impressionists) influenced development of the 20th century art. Galenson argues that changes in the market place allowed (and asked for) greater and faster innovations which in turn generated a large number of new styles and genres, and gave birth to a novel artist behaviors. The demand for innovation suited Conceptual Artists who thrived from “reducing style to a short-run strategy rather than a long-run goal.”

Book: The Art Question

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‘The Art Question’ by Nigel Warburton is a fantastic read for those interested in aesthetics and ‘What is art?’ or ‘Is this art?’ question. Warburton looks at some of the best known art theories – Clive Bell’s formalism, R.G. Collingwood’s expressionism, Wittgensteinian denial of the possibility of definition, George Dickie’s Institutional Theory (inspired in part by Arthur Danto), and Jerrold Levinson’s intentional-historical definition – and concludes that art can not be generalised (“The art question resists […] general claim.”) and that there is no simple, all-encompassing definition for it. Instead, Warburton suggests “the role of theorising about art’s definition is best restricted to particular cases,” as a way to approach and analyse individual works case-by-case.